Welcome to The Football Sack’s Dummies Guide to the Women’s World Cup where you can catch-up on everything you need to know in time for kick-off on Sunday! Come back every day this week for the next chapter of the Dummies Guide.

Dummies Guide to the Women’s World Cup: Chapter Two

Marta (Brazil)

Five-time FIFA World Player of the Year, 91 caps and 79 goals for Brazil, 14 major club titles all around the world, dual Olympic Silver medalist and zero World Cups. A World Cup crown is the one glaring omission on Marta’s glittering CV. Considered one of the best players right now of both genders, put it simply Marta has been without peer in the women’s game. Canada could well be the 29-year-old’s last crack at an elusive World Cup title and will lead her country at a World Cup for the fourth time. A big game player of the highest order, Marta has hit 14 World Cup goals from 14 matches and will be an integral part of the Brazil side who are searching for their first World Cup crown.

Homare Sawa (Japan)

Both the Golden Boot and Golden Ball winner from 2011, Sawa will lead Japan in Canada as her country looks to retain their World Cup title. The attacking midfielder has been a mainstay of the Nadeshiko for over two decades and will make her 200th international cap in Canada. An attacking midfielder, Sawa currently plays for INAC Kobe Leonessa in Japan’s First Division. Sawa has played most of her club football in her homeland but did have a spell in America in the old Women’s United Soccer Association for three seasons for the Atlanta Beat. Sawa is Japan’s all-time leading games holder and will head to her sixth World Cup finals.

Abby Wambach (USA)

2012 FIFA World Player of the Year and finalist for the past two years, Wambach is a genuine star of the women’s game. The 34 year old striker is one of the US’s most celebrated players with a whopping 241 caps for the USWNT scoring 182 goals along the way. Playing in her fourth World Cup, Wambach lead the line for the Americans as they aim for their first world crown since 1999. Along with her mountain of accolades in the football arena, Wambach was included in Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of the World in 2015 and July 20 is now called ‘Abby Wambach Day’ in her home town of Rochester, New York.

Christine Sinclair (Canada)

Sinclair will have the honour of leading her country at a home World Cup in 2015. One of Canada’s greatest women’s players of all time, Sinclair holds the record for most caps with 219 and most goals with 153 and is not only one of their most decorated footballers but also one of their most decorated sportspeople of all time. A member of Canada’s Walk of Fame which recognises the accomplishments and achievements of successful Canadians, Sinclair has also received Canada’s highest sporting honour, the Lou Marsh Trophy. Sinclair played a major part in Canada claiming the Bronze medal at the 2012 London Olympics and will once again be the main focal point for her country this World Cup. Sinclair has two uncles who have also represented Canada in international football.

Nilla Fischer (Sweden)

One of the best defenders in the game, Fischer plays her club football in Germany for Wolfsburg in their 2013/14 Bundesliga and Champions League winning season. The Swede first started football life as a defensive midfielder and has won most of her 122 caps in that position before a switch to the back line in 2013. Ficher was a key member of Sweden’s run to the Semi Finals in the 2013 Women’s Euro championships and will be their rock in defence in Canada with her leadership and calmness.

Louisa Necib (France)

“The Female Zidane”, Necib is considered one of the most skilful female footballers in the world. Picked in the All-Star Team in the 2011 World Cup and nominated in the FIFA Puskas Award for the best goal in 2013, Necib is renowned for her exceptional touch and outstanding passing game and is expected to light up Canada 2015. A multiple Champions League and French Division One title winner with Lyon, the 28 year old midfielder has already amassed 125 caps for France and will be a key part of the side tipped to go far in the tournament.

The Football Sack’s Dummies Guide to the Women’s World Cup
Tune in each day for the next chapter

Chapter One: Matildas World Cup History
Chapter Two: Stars of 2015
Chapter Three: W-League Imports
Chapter Four: Five Moments that Mattered
Chapter Five: The Contenders
Chapter Six: Meet the Matildas

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