Following one of the most entertaining World Cups in memory, and the first to be broadcast in full in Australia, The Football Sack is ready to announce its World Cup XI.

Following on from the successful and controversial W-League Team of the Year format, all writers selected their Best personal XI to create the overall team of the tournament. Between all of our writers every match and every players was viewed in action.

Think we’ve still got it wrong? Tell us in the comments section below, on Facebook and on Twitter!

Some of the Contenders

Goalkeepers
Dinnia Díaz – Costa Rica. Was terrific in goal for Costa Rica, her 19 saves in three matches got them to the brink of qualification for the Round of 16.
Hope Solo – United States of America. The 33-year-old showed no signs of slowing down and was instrumental in allowing the US to progress on razor thin margins.
Karen Bardsley – England. Took one for the team on more than one ocassion and generally took ownership of everything the opposition threw at her.

Centre Backs
Azusa Iwashimizu – Japan. The experiences gained from two previous World Cups has helped Iwashimizu control things at the back for Japan.
Julie Johnston – United States of America. Third choice central defender just months before the World Cup started, Johnson was infallible at the tournament and may wear the armband for Team USA one day.
Saki Kumagai – Japan. A key part of Japan’s defensive success in Canada, Kumagai didn’t have a problem moving to midfield to help control possession.
Wendie Renard – France. The rangy, imposing Renard lead by example for France all tournament. Her partnership with Laura Georges is one of the best in the world.

Wing Backs
Aya Sameshima – Japan. At 28, Sameshima has reached new peaks in Canada and complemented her backline superbly. She had no problem taking the ball forward on the left, either.
Caitlin Foord – Australia. Her constant enterprise for the Matildas was matched only by her defensive prowess.
Laure Boulleau – France, Developed a strong understanding with Louisa Necib on the left hand side. Her driving runs from left fullback saw her make a positive impression in the attacking third on several occasions.
Lucy Bronze – England. Excellent, consistent performer for England who got forward well and scored one of the goals of the tournament against Norway in the Round of 16.
Saori Ariyoshi – Japan. The right-back has been instrumental in Japan’s resolute defending and even got up the other end to score her maiden international goal.

Centre Midfielders
Carli Lloyd – United States of America. Outstanding all tournament and was one of the main attacking threats for the number two nation in the world, electric in the knockout stages.
Elise Kellond-Knight – Australia. Possibly the best Matilda throughout the tournament with her composed, quality screening and distribution a highlight of the World Cup for all.
Eugénie Le Sommer – France. A candidate for player of the tournament, involved at the heart of everything good France did. Her link up play was of the highest class and provided a catalogue of game-changing moments.
Fara Williams – England. One of the few mainstays in a team constantly changing and it gave England some much needed backbone and discipline. A real leader and assured from the penalty spot.
Megan Rapinoe – United States of America. Another veteran who consistently improved as the tournament rolled on, starred in their semi-final against Germany and showed why she is still one of the best midfielders in the world.

Forwards
Anja Mittag – Germany. Involved in more goals than any other player at the tournament and a crucial attacking weapon in Germany’s ruthless arsenal.
Asisat Oshoala – Nigeria. Possibly the most exciting player to watch at the tournament and a player to keep an eye on in the rapidly improving football nation.
Aya Miyama – Japan. Two goals and two assists for the Japanese captain are indicative of the superb World Cup she has had. Japan has dominated each opponent largely thanks to her form on the left wing.
Célia Šašić – Germany. Although her record is going to be blighted by the devastating penalty miss against the USA, Celia Sasic still managed to win the Golden Boot holder, equal with Carli Lloyd, netting six goals and proving why she’s one of the best forwards in the game.
Christine Sinclair – Canada. Captain of the Canadian national team, twelve-time recipient of the Canadian Soccer Player of the Year Award and Canada’s all-time leading goal-scorer.
Élodie Thomas – France. One of the quickest at the tournament and her electrifying pace gave opposition fullbacks nightmares whilst her delivery in the final third was usually assured.
Gaëlle Enganamouit – Cameroon. The Cameroonian striker was in top touch for her nation, bagging three goals and a superb assist in her first ever World Cup.
Simone Laudehr – Germany. Playing close to all 480 minutes that Germany battled through in the World Cup, Laudehr was a staple part of the German midfield machine, even bagging herself a goal in the campaign.

Coaches
Alen Stajcic – Australia. Brought out the best tactically for the Matildas as well as in each individual player. Had the team focused on their task every time they took the field, faultless performance.
Mark Sampson – England. An almost nailed on favourite for manager of the tournament. First English manager to beat Germany and just the third to reach the semi-finals of a World Cup. The sky’s the limit for Sampson and his side.
Philippe Bergeroo – France. When his team got going, they looked the best side at the tournament and dominated Germany in the Quarter Final, losing on penalties.

World Cup 2015 Best XI

Goalkeeper: Hope Solo
Right Back: Caitlin Foord
Centre Backs: Julie Johnston & Azusa Iwashimizu
Left Back: Aya Sameshima
Defensive Midfielder: Elise Kellond-Knight
Attacking Midfielders: Eugénie Le Sommer & Megan Rapinoe
Right Wing: Christine Sinclair
Left Wing: Asisat Oshoala
Centre Forward: Célia Šašić

Coach: Mark Sampson
Assistant Coach: Philippe Bergeroo

Bench: Karen Bardsley, Lucy Bronze, Saki Kumagai, Fara Williams, Carli Lloyd, Gaëlle Enganamouit, Ania Mittag

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