Following the less than impressive crowds viewership numbers for the 2015 FFA Cup, you’d be forgiven for concluding that the Cup hasn’t reached the heights that Australian football fans and FFA would’ve liked.

The only route for the Westfield FFA Cup, then, is up. Here’s how we’ll get there:

More lights, camera and action at grassroots grounds

With FFA Cup matches played midweek at night, the quality of the lighting determines where a game can be played. Due to the overall low quality and low supply of lighting at Member Federation club home grounds, many clubs have had to play their cup ties away from home, forgoing attendees and revenue in the process.

For example, Hume City “hosted” their Semi Final against Melbourne Victory at AAMI Park, rather than their 4000-capacity Broadmeadows home ground. For Hume City this won’t happen again as they’re in the process of upgrading their venue lighting. This means higher attendances and more revenue for Hume. As more clubs upgrade their stadium lights, they’ll see a corresponding increase in their bank accounts and match attendances when the FFA Cup comes to town.

The buzz can only get louder

It’s only the second year of the competition. Australia has an overly saturated sporting market; if its not NRL, AFL or rugby, then its cricket, football, tennis or something else altogether (we get crunk for Darts apparently).

Not only does the FFA Cup pale in contrast to the established sporting competitions in Australia, but at the pointy end of the tournament it also has to play second-fiddle to the Hyundai A-League.

The day after the FFA Cup Final I spoke to at least four football people who said that they didn’t even know the game had already been played. They also asked who played in the final and who won. If this is an indication of the current buzz around the cup, or lack thereof, then it can only improve.

It’s an Australian sporting competition like no other

The FFA Cup has been marketed through the phrase the “Magic of the Cup.” No other competition in Australia pits professional against non-professional player. For grassroots footballers that’s a huge carrot to be involved and engaged.

In the end, the competition will organically grow as it becomes a regular fixture on the Australian football calendar. The growth of the FFA Cup is not in doubt but it will take time and resources for it to become a stalwart sporting competition in Australia.

We football fans are simply an impatient bunch.

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Sydney FC and Manchester United fan. Digital Publishing Coordinator at Fox Sports Australia. B Media & B Commerce from UNSW. Former Guinness World Record holder for longest video game marathon (FIFA 11 for 30 hours).