Football Federation Australia (FFA) today confirmed two friendly games for the Socceroos against Greece later this year, and it was hard to contain the laughter at the hypocrisy of the whole thing.

In June, ANZ Stadium in Sydney will host the first contest between the reigning Asian Champions and a side that lost twice to the Faroes Islands and finished bottom of Group F in the recent Euro 2016 qualifiers.

A venue has yet to be confirmed for the second game in Melbourne on June 7.

The announcement was made at Alpha Greek restaurant in Sydney, and we can no doubt look forward to Fox Sports dropping countless souvlaki references into their broadcast if the FFA Cup games are anything to go by.

“Greece has a proud football history and with so many Australians having a Greek heritage this is going to be a special match,” said FFA Chief Executive David Gallop.

“We look forward to seeing a sea of green and gold Socceroos supporters and the passionate Greek football fans create a tremendous atmosphere as we return to ANZ Stadium.”

So, why are the Socceroos playing Greece?

Well, the answer is simple – there are massive Greek communities all across Australia who will pay top dollar to watch the nation of their heritage in action on these shores for the first time in a decade.

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Adult ticket prices for the game in Sydney range between $35.68 (of which there won’t be many on offer) and $158.02 before Ticketek take you to the cleaners with their fees.

There is nothing wrong with the FFA making money off the back of the national team’s recent success; the Socceroos have lacked a major sponsor since Optus pulled the plug in 2013 so the association needs to generate revenue somehow.

However, hypocrisy comes into play when you recall the National Club Identity Policy (NCIP) that was trotted out by the FFA in June 2014.

The NCIP “aims to promote and strengthen the reputation of football in Australia by making the sport of football inclusive for all participants” by disallowing references to ethnicity in new or updated club logos and names.

It states that submissions will only be accepted if “components do not carry any ethnic, national, political, racial or religious connotations either in isolation or combination”.

So if, for example, 100 Greek community members get together and decide to set up a new football team they can’t call it ‘Hellas <insert team name here>’ or use a phoenix on their club badge.

Yet David Gallop was more than happy to leverage Greek culture to add depth to the international friendlies announcement this morning.

Repeated calls for the NCIP to be removed have fallen on deaf ears, while its application has been somewhat sketchy in the FFA Cup.

All today proves is that the FFA is prepared to use the background of its fans when it suits, i.e. to line the coffers.

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Neil has covered the Perth Glory and the Hyundai A-League for five years and is one of Western Australia's most knowledgeable football journalists.