Before starting this review I should probably admit to a bit of bias. I am a huge Manchester United fan – have been since I was a wee nipper and Bryan Robson was my very first bona-fide hero.

You Can’t Win Anything With Kids: Eric Cantona & Manchester United’s 1995-96 Season
By Wayne Barton

As such, any book on Manchester United is going to pique my interest. Add in a couple of trophies, a splash of cult-hero magic from Eric Cantona and some Scouse-busting and we have a winner!

I was sure I would enjoy reminiscing about the 1995/96 season when reading Wayne Barton’s match-by-match account of a campaign that began horribly at Villa Park, prompting Liverpool Legend Alan Hansen’s public utterance of the books’ title “You can’t win anything with kids” on Match of the Day that evening, and ending with the ‘Double-Double’ at Wembley Stadium.

As a United fan you won’t be disappointed. For Reds of a certain vintage, this was a remarkable team. It’s humbling, and shows your age, to think that a number of fans these days won’t have seen the likes of Paul Scholes, David Beckham, Gary Neville, Nicky Butt, and ‘Le Roi’ Eric Cantona play.

Barton recounts the build-up to the campaign, including the sale of United stars Paul Ince, Mark Hughes and Andrei Kancheslskis the preceding summer, through the integration of the young ‘Class of 92’ reliving all the games and magic moments on the way to Cantona’s sublime FA Cup winning goal against Liverpool.

There’s even a reminder of the horrendous cream suits that Liverpool wore.

Easily digestible due to its game-by-game lay-out, the book is a historical record of a remarkable time in the history of Manchester United. As a piece of footballing record it’s worth it’s place on any bookshelf.

For non-United fans it may be a non-essential but, in terms of understanding how the game has evolved since Beckham et al. burst onto the scene, it’s worth a read. And at the very least it will enable you to regale your friends with the tale of French defender William Prunier and his two-match loan spell at the club!

At only 256 pages – and a smaller shaped book – it’s a short read but interspersed with interviews and quotes from the time Barton has captured the era and produced a lovingly crafted volume of work.

RATING: 3 / 5

Book Review: Three Stars

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