NSL clubs upset at A-League NCIP exemption

Wellington Phoenix have shockingly revealed they have been an ethnic club all along in a stunning snub of FFA’s National Club Identity Policy.

On Thursday, Phoenix unveiled a new logo for the upcoming season which contains a Maori language inscription reading “‘E Rere Te Keo’ – a call to arms that references local geography and culture.

However, early indications suggest the inscription may be in breach of the FFA’s National Club Identity Policy which states that all logos must only contain words written in English.

The policy also states, “A Club Name, logo or emblem or its components, either in isolation or combination, must not carry any ethnic, national, political, racial or religious connotations, signifiers or associations.”

It is unclear if Phoenix were granted exemption to the NCIP, and if so, why.

Many former National Soccer League and state-based clubs have long criticised the NCIP, which prevents them from providing clear association with their traditional ethnic supporter bases and history in their branding and logos.

The President of one former NSL club, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said the new logo meant that the NCIP should now be scrapped altogether.

“In recent years our club, and many others, have changed their logos and had to remove any reference to our cultural heritage due to the NCIP.”

“We even have to maintain a minimum spacing between our logo and the price of our souvlaki wraps on the canteen price board.”

“So, really, it’s a bit of a joke that a plastic franchise with no heritage at all can manufacture a cultural connection and not follow the same rules.”

He added, “We may be a so-called ‘wog club’, but at least we actually play in Australia, farken.”

Local Maori leaders were also confused by the new Phoenix logo, with many admitting they have never heard of the club or the round-ball code.

“We are checking to see what this is all about,” a spokesperson said, “we were not aware there were any other football codes except for rugby union.”

It is understood that other A-League clubs will now investigate the inclusion of non-English wording on their logos to increase their commercial appeal.

Western Sydney Wanderers are believed to be considering adding the word ‘bro’ to the end of all sentences in all future press releases and official club documents.

While Central Coast Mariners are reportedly also considering switching their branding to a version more in keeping with the local “Stoner-pidgen” English dialect.

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