“It’s 2-1 Australia, they keep on believing,” were the words that rung around every Australian household at as Mile Jedinak penalty put the Socceroos 2-1 up against the Netherlands in the group stage of the 2014 FIFA World Cup.

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With the eyes of the world on them the Socceroos were leading against a side who’d just smashed defending champions Spain 5-1 in their last match.

Despite losing all three of their matches in a group containing Spain, the Netherlands and Chile Australia showed they could mix it with the best.

Ange Postecoglou has since taken his unheralded Socceroos side to a 2015 Asian Cup triumph before impressing many at this year’s Confederations Cup.

Whether Postecoglou leaves his post after upcoming two-legged playoff against Honduras or after next year’s World Cup in Russia he goes having left a legacy on Australian football.

Postecolgou has shown that Australia can play an attractive style against anyone, playing high pressing, passing football with a young and pacey side. Despite many arguing he simply doesn’t have the players to match his attacking philosophy.

This lack of belief in the available crop of Australian players available was evident in the reigns of Postecoglou’s predecessors Holger Osieck and Pim Verbeek who appeared satisfied to pick veterans, sit deep and grind out results.

Australia’s combative and competitive displays under Postecoglou are in stark contrast to the humiliating 6-0 defeats to Brazil and France that forced Osieck’s departure in late 2013.

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While many will argue the Socceroos passage to the Round of 16 in the 2006 World Cup under Guus Hiddink surpasses Postecoglou’s achievements the quality that Hiddink had Australia’s “golden generation” at his disposal.

Much of the debate surrounding three at the back mirrors that of the belief that Australia can’t play attacking football against top nations because they don’t have the players.

That fact shows Postecoglou to be an innovative and forward thinking coach who constantly learning and adapting to the game of football as it develops and changes.

This isn’t dissimilar to Pep Guardiola who’s tinkered with the shape of his sides throughout his career, utilising a false-nine at Barcelona before playing with back threes at both Bayern Munich and Manchester City.

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Three at the back which includes variations such as 3-4-3 and 3-5-2, has proved to be both popular and successful amongst world footballs leading sides in recent times including the likes of Chelsea and Juventus.

While it’s not disputed that missing out on World Cup qualification would be disastrous for Australian football as a whole, the self-belief that Postecoglou has instilled within the playing group coupled with a number of assured-attacking displays on the world stage leaves an invaluable lasting legacy on Australian football.

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Currently studying a Bachelor of Digital Media and Communication at Southern Cross University, Thibault is a digital content editor at Gold Coast City and works as a football correspondent for APN Newspapers. Olympique Lyon and Socceroos fan, passionate about the growth of football in Australia.