The body that oversees all of football will soon hand down its plan for Australian football. But will it be more than the anti-Lowy crowd bargained for?

We await the end to the much-publicised but critically misunderstood Football Federation Australia (FFA) reform fiasco, which should come to a head over the next 24-48 hours.

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The wait stems down to a FIFA committee meeting where 19 association members will soon vote on whether the FFA congress should be dissolved and replaced by FIFA’s dreaded normalisation committee.

A normalisation committee is equally menacing in its nature as it is by name.

By definition the committee – that would likely constitute of half a dozen Australian football figures – would be in charge of the daily grind of Australian football and according to FIFA Statute 15(e), would develop a congress “in accordance with the principles of representative democracy, taking into account the importance of gender equality in football”.

Sounds lovely, but how that unfolds is anyone’s guess.

The past three years has seen eight countries fall into FIFA’s grip, including the high profile incidents of Argentina and Cameroon.

But Argentina would be the first to tell you that “normalisation” is not something these committees achieve.

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As FIFA stepped in in 2016, the government stepped out. Crucial funding for the nation’s leagues was pulled with the dearth in funding causing huge delays in the league.

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Coupled with a cesspool of incessant infighting with similarities to our situation Argentina is years away from truly becoming “normal” and will carry scars from this debacle for decades.

Cameroon’s committee was only set up months ago but it reflects a situation quite similar to Australia’s, where internal wrangles have created divisions that previous efforts of mediation from FIFA have been unable to unify.

The footballing body’s mediators have already had their stay in Australia.

And much like our African counterparts FIFA was unsuccessful in bridging the gap between the FFA and the A-League/PFA.

Now our country – and our bid for the 2023 Women’s World Cup – may have to suffer for it.

Lowy and his brigade argue that a normalisation committee would drag football back to the dark ages, yet the proposed model he brings to the table fails to represent its parties fairly or address gender equality. It’s the pot calling the kettle black.

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On the other hand A-League owners want the change but also carry their own vested interests at heart.

And there’s nothing an owner dreams of more than the overthrow of an overbearing regime.

Bitter feuds, backward thinking and personal interests are the biggest threats to the beautiful game in this country.

Normalisation committee or not, is it too much to ask for some reconciliation and unity?

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Adelaide-based writer, content creator and story-teller. Like one of those determined ants that require a second flick.