Western Sydney Wanderers coach Josep Gombau discredits claims that the loss of marquee striker Oriol Riera to an injury in the first half against Brisbane Roar had any significant impact on the outcome of game.

Riera abruptly left the field in the 17th minute and immediately made his way back up the tunnel amidst speculation over an injured hamstring.

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The loss of the Spanish striker was followed shortly by another injury to forward Jaushua Sotirio and before the half ended substitutes Brendon Santalab and Jack Clisby were unexpectedly forced thrown into action.

Gombau addressed the quick succession of injuries by moving Jumpei Kusukami to the right wing and shifting Raul Llorente further up the field to slot Clisby into left back.

The Wanderers were the more proficient side entering the contest and prior to his injury Riera almost flicked home a header early in the half but was just wide of obtaining an early lead.

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However following the injuries Brisbane Roar became invigorated and pressured late in the half before Massimo Maccarone eventually opened the scoring with his left footed half volley on the stroke of halftime.

Gombau however was generally pleased with the performance and did not believe the loss of Riera was to blame for the shift in quality.

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“We have other players that can replace him and I think that we had a good game,” he said post match.

“We conceded the goal late in the first half, after that in the second half we started in good way.

“We had a chance, we didn’t take the chance.”

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Back to back two nil losses have done little to aid Gombau’s cause for the implementation of Barcelona-inspired possession football and the potential loss of the Wanderers’ leading goal scorer will only add to the plethora of issues which have faced the club this season.

Gombau remained unfazed by the result against Brisbane and speculates that the implementation of his style will begin to take effect over the coming rounds.

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“Honestly I think we are not that far away,” he said.

“Other teams are taking mistakes and small errors to score their goals.

“It’s only this that is different.”

Gombau explained that placing a time frame on when his style will begin to operate cannot be specified as the implementation of a new style often proves to be a tedious and challenging task.

“The results are not coming,” he admitted.

“If someone thinks in three games we can change this they don’t understand how difficult it is to work and how difficult it is change things in football.

“It is a process and I’m sure we can do a very good job.”

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Second year bachelor of Journalism student at the University of Wollongong. Aspiring Journalist, looking forward to the coming season!