Any Australian football fan that is still clinging to the hope that Bert van Marjwijk will continue along the path of Ange Postecoglou, his predecessor, are likely to be left disappointed after the Dutchman’s recent statements about how he plans to do the job his way, in his first appearance in Australia after taking up the job.

Marwijk’s reputation, on account of his stellar work with the Saudi Arabian national team and the near win in the 2010 World Cup with Netherlands, suggests that he should be able to take the Australian team to new heights in the upcoming World Cup. If his prior work can indeed be relied upon as a marker for his future performance, then it spells excellent news for punters looking to bet on the Australian team, making it the perfect time to grab a free bet and start betting on football to make some serious money from the country’s potentially successful run at the 2018 World Cup. However, as is often the case, glory does not come repeatedly, and whether van Marwijk is able to emulate his prior successes with Australia remains to be seen.

Departure from Postecoglou’s approach

It must also be noted that not everyone’s happy with the Dutchman’s appointment, with murmurs of discontent becoming quickly evident on social media. The discontent can be attributed to his coaching style – pragmatic, with an intense focus on the result of a game, rather than the style, with his first appearance before Australian media doing little to dispel these assumptions.

In several ways, van Marwijk’s coaching style runs directly counter to Postecoglou’s, and the Football Federation Australia’s approach. Despite the departure from the earlier approach, both Steven Lowy and David Gallop, working alongside Marwijk at the FFA office in Sydney, maintained that the was the right person for the job.

Working with the team’s style

Unlike his predecessor, who was criticised for guiding the team in a manner that was not suited to their technique, Marwijk appears inclined to work as per the team’s abilities. “I’m a realistic coach,” the former Saudi Arabia coach said. “I like creative football, I like to have the ball, but I also like to win and that’s the most important thing. It’s important that we play in a way that fits the players and also the coach. You cannot play in a way the players cannot do, and when they don’t like to play in a way you want to play, then you make a mistake.”

Over the course of the coming months, Marwijk has a substantial challenge ahead of him, considering his primary objective is to come out of a group comprising of Peru, Denmark and France, making this a priority over any philosophical aspirations. The challenge is compounded due to the short amount of time on his hands to forge a team that is capable enough for the task.

While it would be a fool’s call to guarantee any kind of successful result before the tournament actually kicks off, it is also true that van Marwijk would not have taken the job if he was not confident that the Australian team was up to the challenge

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