The VAR has received a bad rap over the last few weeks and it’s no wonder why.

There is no denying the utilisation of VAR in the A-League has been terrible but does this mean we should suspend it? Absolutely not.

It’s not the technology at fault here, Australia just have to get better at using it. Here are five reasons why we should get around the VAR.

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  1. It will stop diving in the box.

One of the benefits VAR has is it allows referees to review shouts for penalties and ultimately stamp out simulation inside the box.

This was the case during the World Cup when Brazil had a penalty rightfully overturned after it was clear Neymar had gone down far too easily in the box. This is what should have happened when Bruno Fornaroli went down during the Melbourne derby.

In this instance it was the referee who made the error, which is incredibly ironic considering the VAR was implemented to limit human error not to exacerbate it. But the Melbourne derby aside, there is nothing which riles up a football fan than seeing an opposition player milk a penalty.

Fortunately, we now have the technology to prevent this from happening and punish players who choose to dive inside the box as opposed to seeing yet another referee sucked in by these acts.

  1. Holding in the box.

Imagine how far Australia would have gone in tournaments gone by if Tim Cahill was awarded a penalty every time he was man-handled in the box.

Had VAR been around in 2006 Australia would have beaten Italy easily with the latter employing rugby-like tackles as a means of stopping Mark Viduka.

With plenty of eyes from the bunker now fixated on every set-piece, these kinds of holds and grapples inside the area should be picked up on. Albeit this will be difficult to enforce given there are often multiple incidents during the one set piece.

Coming down on this could act as a catalyst for players to stop or better disguise such obvious holds during set-pieces, allowing the game to flow.

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  1. Rectifying CLEAR and OBVIOUS errors

This has been the most referred to phrase in Australian football in the last fortnight. FFA CEO David Gallop was bang on when he conceded the referees were using VAR to nit-pick at decisions as opposed to rectifying howlers.

Referring to VAR for free kicks which are ‘technically’ fouls is not what the technology was brought in for. Referees should not be going to VAR unless they’ve missed something even Stevie Wonder would have seen.

The technology should be embraced and celebrated for its ability to give referees a chance to right a wrong and above all else give justice to the players and fans who impacted by the decision.

There are countless times throughout history where players, fans and referees would have killed for a do-over to rectify a wrong call.

Now we can.

  1. Keeps us on FIFA’s good side.

It’s no secret we as Australians have had an interesting relationship with FIFA.

Hence, it’s probably best we do whatever we can to stay on their good side by making the most out of the VAR and not kick up too much of a fuss.

FIFA clearly has trust in the system and their faith was justified after a near flawless use of VAR at the most recent World Cup.

  1. Can work towards improving the welfare of referees.

Anyone who’s ever been a referee at any level understands it’s not the easiest job in the world. It really does take a certain type of character to be a referee, one who’s respected and somewhat feared.

Allowing referees to review and rectify incorrect decisions can only do wonders for their own personal welfare for it alleviates tension with players, coaches and supporters.

It also helps in improving the mental and emotional welfare of the referees post-match who can at least go to bed that night knowing they made the right decision with the aid of the technology.

In addition, it will also shut up the fans who cry “if only…” as VAR will be able to step in to correct any wrong decisions.

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RMIT Journalism | Football Nation Radio Like all football fans my general mood for the week is dictated by how my team performs over the weekend.