Recently, the FFA revealed they were starting a campaign to help get Australia to host the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023.

However, this isn’t possible without support from the public and if we want to host one of the world’s best sporting events, we need to make our voices heard.

If you’re not convinced, here are the top four reasons you should #GetOnside.

  1.  The FIFA Women’s World Cup has serious support

The Women’s World Cup is no a small event. The last iteration (Canada 2015) saw:

  • 750 million people watch it worldwide
  • The final was the most watched soccer event in United States history
  • The final attracted more viewers than the Stanley Cup and NBA Finals
  • The highest overall attendance for a FIFA Women’s World Cup ever

I am no mathematician but those are some seriously good numbers and the most exciting thing is they translated into financial success. Canada Soccer says that hosting the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup alongside the U20 Women’s World Cup in 2014 generated $436 million of economic activity, in other words roughly what Usain Bolt wanted from Central Coast.

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Again, no mathematician but those numbers indicate Australia could reap some financial benefits which may even be able to filter down and help-out cash-strapped grass-roots clubs in desperate need.

#GetOnside is a #bargain.

2) Australia knows how to throw a sporting event

In Australia we are good at many things: changing Prime Ministers, Eurovision, winning knock-out qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup and shoeys.

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You can add: hosting top-notch sporting events to that list.

In 2000, Olympic President Juan Antonio Samaranch declared Sydney had hosted the “best Olympic games ever”, which is cool until you consider he declared the sentiment at every Olympic Games except 1996.

But taking it on face value, Sydney were lauded for being “forward-thinking”, progressive and ushering in a new-standard for the Olympic Games and the same sentiment has been applied to the 2006 Commonwealth Games.

The last time Australia hosted a global football event, the 2015 Asian Cup, it was a blast with many games selling-out and amongst the highest attended crowds seen at an Asian Cup.

No one parties quite like an Aussie, just ask a Bali local, and this World Cup would be on par.

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3) This tournament is a goal-fest

Consider all the fun you had watching the 2018 FIFA World Cup as the teams scored 169 goals over 64 games for an average of 2.6. Now consider, the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup saw 146 in 52 games for a higher average of 2.8. This also included Ecuador being belted 10-1 at the hands of Switzerland and Côte d’Ivoire being hammered 10-0 by Germany.

Imagine the goal fest we could potential have on our hands here! Imagine watching as the Matildas abandon the defensive mindset which lingers in the men’s game and throw caution to the win by playing all-out attack, producing goal after goal.

That would bring more neutrals on board and be my kind of party.

4) It would give the Matildas and W-League much needed recognition

If financial incentive or the promise of a good time or seeing high-scoring, high-octane action won’t convince you, I am not sure what will.

Except this.

The Matildas are ranked sixth in the world. Yes, you read that right, the world.

This makes the Matildas Australia’s best ranked national team which is reward for some serious hard-work and development over the past couple of years.

The kudos for that goes to the W-League, one of the premier women’s leagues in the world. It was pioneering a path for women in sport before AFLW or women’s Big Bash was even in a twinkle in the eye of those respective sporting bodies and has developed a cult-following in the United States.

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The W-League regularly attracts world-class talent, such as when it hosted Nadine Angerer, who was crowned FIFA Women’s world player of the year during her stay in 2014. The league is home to the likes of Lisa De Vanna and Sam Kerr who have been nominated or shortlisted for FIFA Awards in the past and are seen as two of the best strikers ever.

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Australia, you have one of the best women’s teams going around and a world-class football league on your doorstep.

Isn’t it time we show a bit of national pride, get around the girls and celebrate our thriving women’s game?

The answer is yes.

Show your support for the #GetOnside campaign by clicking here and help bring the Women’s World Cup down under.

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A student at University of South Australia who hopes his writing disguises his lack of sporting prowess and a fan who masquerades his choice in mediocre teams as being hipster