Families can sometimes be a pain but for Georgia Campagnale, it has often been the inspiration behind her key loves. 

Campagnale, 21, can’t quite remember how she started football. All she remembers is running and kicking a ball at her brother’s junior game.

It’s a small detail which spawned a love affair with the world game which still exists over a decade later.

“I was about four or five and I went to watch my brother play in the juniors and I just got the ball and started running with it and kicking it because I just wanted to copy my brother,” she said.

“I joined the club when I was six… that was Modbury Vista so it was local,” Campagnale said.

From there, Campagnale moved onto one of South Australia’s powerhouse clubs in Adelaide City to play in the Women’s National Premier League (WNPL) before breaking into the Adelaide United W-League in 2014/15 and she still represents both teams today.

Embed from Getty Images

“The W-League is a much higher standard, the pace, the intensity… but obviously this is my fifth season playing W-League so I am used to the step-up.”

Despite being only 21, Campagnale is one of Adelaide’s more experienced players which underlines Adelaide’s relative youth and Campagnale’s experience.

“Of course I try to be a leader but we also have our older players like our captain Emma and Michelle who are very experienced but I think everyone in the team brings different forms of leadership and I think it works well for us.”

Embed from Getty Images

Outside of football, Georgia is currently studying a Masters of Nutrition and Dietetics having completed a Bachelor in Nutrition and Food Science last year.

The degree was prompted by the love of food past on from her family to her and a genuine want to make the people around her be the best they can be.

“I’ve always been interested in food and I thought how can I help people who are in need and (have) issues and how can I help make them feel better,” Campagnale said.

“And I’ve always had an interest in the science of food and how it can affect our bodies, so I decided to go ahead and do it and I am really enjoying it.

“I am Italian as well so I feel like your genetically made up to love food, so it is a bit of the Italian background.”

Setting herself up for the future is widely supported both by Flinders University and also by Adelaide United, especially coach Ivan Karlović.

“Obviously you aren’t going to play football for the rest of your life, so obviously you need to have a career outside of it.

“Ivan is very supportive in getting that education and developing your career post-football.”

SHARE
A student at University of South Australia who hopes his writing disguises his lack of sporting prowess and a fan who masquerades his choice in mediocre teams as being hipster