Kayo Sports – the self-proclaimed ‘Netflix of sport’ – has been out for about three weeks now.

Debuting in beta form on Wednesday 7 November, the full product was officially released this week on Monday.

Having subscribed almost immediately upon the beta’s soft launch, I’ve had a bit of time with Kayo.

So how have I found it so far? Like many, I’ve been impressed.

What’s on offer

For those unfamiliar, Kayo Sports can be briefly described as ‘Fox Sports but online and cheaper’.

Kayo offers all 50+ sports available on Fox Sports – bar its Sky Racing, Eurosport and three Premier League club channels – in a Netflix-esque streaming platform for either $25 or $35 per month, depending on whether you want simultaneous access on two or three devices.

Kayo is currently available on Browser, ChromeCast, Apple TV, App Store and Google Play-supported platforms, with added support for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Telstra TV and other brand-specific Smart TV platforms believed to be on the way.

A full list of sports available on Kayo can be found ON THEIR WEBSITE.

The interface

You can watch the A-League live for only $25 a month. Click here to read our review of Kayo Sports and to start your 14-day free trial.

Borrowing much from Netflix, Kayo’s interface is well organised and easily navigable.

The personalisation of Kayo is nice, with users able to individually tailor the sports and other content – including documentaries, weekly shows and historic highlights – they want to see.

Upon opening Kayo, users are greeted with scrolling windows of live, recently played and upcoming games from their preferred sports.

Sports are each divided into individual categories via a collapsible top bar with the option to tune directly into a Fox Sport channel also available if you’re having trouble deciding what to watch.

While I didn’t use it much, split screen viewing of up to four sports at a time is another available feature.

Overall, the interface is easy to navigate and makes sense, which bells and whistles aside is all that really matters.

No complaints from me.

Pricing

By far the best feature of Kayo is its pricing.

$25 a month ($300 per year) with no lock-in contract is good value considering the cheapest at which Fox Sports was previously accessible was $54 per month ($702 per year) through Foxtel Now.

And if you choose to split the cost with a friend or family member (like I am), the price looks even better.

My favourite thing about Kayo’s pricing (and likely its business model’s greatest strength, opening the possibility for massive market saturation) is that it makes pay-to-view sports far more accessible to low income earners like students and young people than it ever has been.

Previously only available as part of a Foxtel subscription, this is essentially the first time Fox Sports has been presented as a standalone product.

As a sports lover who grew up in a non-Foxtel household, Kayo’s affordability and accessibility is exciting. This is the first time I’ve ever had the ‘Fox Sports experience’.

The bad

My main complaint so far, as has been that of many users, is Kayo’s issues with stream quality and stability.

Though it’s been perfect watching midday NBA and NCAA basketball matches, I’ve encountered numerous problems of streams crashing or dropping to Standard Definition (from High Definition) when watching prime-time higher demand evening A-League matches.

In Kayo’s defence, these issues for me have only occurred while it was still in beta – at time of writing there’s yet to have been a high-enough demand match to test the fully-released service’s chops.

While I wouldn’t be surprised if some streaming issues persist, at this stage Kayo deserves the benefit of the doubt. If these issues continue into the new year however, especially once the NRL and AFL seasons are underway, then fans can start to worry.

Is it worth it for football fans?

It’s obviously going to be an entirely personal decision whether Kayo’s worth it for you.

An eager follower of several sporting codes, I’ve been like a kid in a candy shop the last few weeks.

As far as football only goes, you get access to the A-League, W-League, FFA Cup, Australian Internationals, AFC Champions League, La Liga, Bundesliga, Serie A, Ligue 1, EFL Championship, FA Cup, MLS, ISL, and FIFA Club World Cup.

Though an enviable rights list for any sports broadcaster, the obvious absentee for Kayo is the Premier League, the regional rights to which are owned by Optus Sport ($15 per month or free with many Optus phone plans).

If you only follow the Premier League, Kayo might not be the best choice for you.

Conversely, if you’re only interested in the A-League or W-League, Telstra’s My Football Live app is much cheaper than Kayo, available at $99.99 per year.

At the end of the day, Kayo’s value really comes down to what football leagues you follow.

My personal bang-for-buck recommendation, as a fan of most aforementioned leagues, would be to split a $25 Kayo subscription with another interested party and consider signing up to a reasonably priced Optus phone plan where Optus Sport is inclusive.

That’s been my approach at least.

Verdict

I’ve been incredibly impressed by Kayo. The package of sports offered at the price point they’re offered is quite simply the best on the market.

Obviously it doesn’t have everything and if you’re only a fan of a particular league or sport you might want to consider a different service.

If you have broad interests as a sporting fan though, Kayo’s a no-brainer. With free 14-day trials currently on offer, it’s at the very least worth a look.

Safe to say I won’t be moving from my couch very much the next few months.

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Loves Brisbane. Loves a pint. Loves a 'Kevin Muscat Bad Tackle' YouTube compilation.