The undeniable advantage given to the striker in a penalty situation could be about to change.

In the A-League alone, more than 81 per cent of penalties have been scored over the last three seasons with 122 converted and only 27 missed.

When the ball is placed 12 yards from goal and the best penalty taker in the team has an uncontested shot, there’s no wonder the odds are stacked heavily against the goalkeeper.

Take Oriol Riera for example, who stepped up to the spot on Saturday afternoon for the Wanderers and stood face-to-face with Jamie Young in the Roar goal.

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Young dived low to his left and parried away the Spaniard’s attempt but the ball fell back into the path of Riera who ambled in to slot home the rebound with Young still scrambling to his feet.

The game eventually finished 2-2 with Riera’s penalty and second goal proving just enough for the Wanderers to hold off the fast-finishing Roar.

But what if things were different?

In early November the International Football Association Board (IFAB) proposed a raft of potential rule changes including a “one-shot” penalty system. The rule would mean when the goalkeeper saves a penalty kick in regular play, the ball would be deemed “dead” and a goal kick would be awarded.

If it were to be approved, goals like Riera’s on Saturday would be no more.

Controversial rule changes are seemingly offered up every second day to fix issues in the game like simulation, time-wasting and dodgy referee decisions but this simple new proposal makes the most sense.

The question is whether one shot on goal is enough vindication to the attacking team who have drawn a foul in the box, and it undoubtedly is.

 

A penalty kick is a methodical, lethal weapon heavily swung in the attackers favour; so when the keeper pulls of an unlikely save, that’s all the attacking side deserves.

When Manchester United hosted Everton two weeks ago and Paul Pogba took longer to run to the ball from the 18-yard-line than Usain Bolt took to sprint 100 metres, I’m sure we were all (barring United fans) hoping like hell Jordan Pickford would deny him to spite his arrogance.

He did, pulling off a stunning save with an outstretched paw; only for Pogba to tuck away the rebound.

That game too finished 2-1, but it shouldn’t have.

A penalty for a foul in the box is en eye for an eye, but once the ball is saved and it spills back into the path of the attacker, it becomes two eyes for the price of one.

And you’d have to be blind not to see the unjust nature of that.

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Football nut, student journalist and firm believer that Berisha dived in the 2012 A-League Grand Final. Covering Perth Glory for the 2018/19 season.