We love a crisis. But what if it’s all going to be okay?

-

Australian football loves a crisis like people in Sydney love cracking on about their bridge. It becomes a strand of identity, one which requires there to always be a cataclysmic issue. But what if there’s not?

I am as guilty as most for this crime of hyperbole. The recent Japanese victory over the Socceroos gave me that little burst of adrenaline and the desperate impulse to reach for my phone and the sweet dopamine hit of the like button. But what if that game wasn’t the damning proof that “Arnieball” is a lost cause, doomed to dull the talents of the current Socceroos?

Embed from Getty Images

What if, instead, it was simply a good performance by an opposition in desperate need of a win. An opposition that hadn’t lost to Australia in over a decade. We are no different when it comes to the A-Leagues either. Maybe the drop-off in crowds and slowing of interest isn’t a sign that the leagues were on their way to the grave, but instead they were a dip that would be followed by a rise, one which we may be seeing begin this season.

So as summer turns to winter does it inevitably turn to spring.

I wasn’t around for the pre-social media era of Australian football but I feel relatively comfortable in saying that its emergence hasn’t helped. Seeing all those takes at once can only add to the encroaching sense of doom. Not to mention that the debates that stem from them lack a human face to bring it all into perspective.

Football is also a microcosm of society and society is filled with conspiracy theories. From the bizarre but harmless ones that would have us falling off the edge of the earth, to the more sinister which undermine our collective safety.

Embed from Getty Images

Ultimately, chances are that the Corleone family wasn’t conspiring to have your favourite manager sacked. The A-Leagues, along with the Socceroos and Matildas, may rise, then dip, then plateau, and eventually rise again. The administration of the game might handle issues as best as they can, for the good of us all. They may also make mistakes for which there need to be serious consequences. This is not to say we shouldn’t be here with loud voices and actions. They might listen though, and it might work out. Maybe we’ll be okay.

Then again, I’ve just written over 400 words about all this and, as they say, he who knows a lot says little and he who knows little, says a lot.

Image credit: Peter Hugg

Enjoy this content? Support The Football Sack

Due in part to COVID and lack of current sponsorship we are at risk of not having the funds to continue running The Football Sack. If you enjoy our content and support our work in training talented young writers, please support us with a donation. If every reader contributed just $3, our funding would be covered for over ten years.

DONATE

Learn with us

Latest Articles

Love your football?
Subscribe to our weekly football wrap. During the season we'll send you all the week's football action straight to your inbox.
* indicates required