Anna Green reflects on how the A-League Women has changed over 10 years

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Football Ferns defender Anna Green has returned to Sydney FC after almost ten years. Women’s football is something that continues to grow across the globe, but how much has changed in Green’s time away from the A-League Women?

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Let’s venture back to the year of 2013, where what was then known as the W-League consisted of eight teams and had a mere 12 rounds. Sydney FC were heading into their sixth time taking part in the league, and 23-year-old Anna Green of the New Zealand national team had just made her Sky Blue debut.

It was a time where players from the Australian national team were still prominent in the league, and Sydney FC was home to Matildas stars Sam Kerr and Caitlin Foord.

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Fast forward to now, the league has seen some significant expansion over the years. The competition is now home to 11 teams and the number of rounds has grown to 20.

Many of the nation’s best players have begun to pursue their careers elsewhere, but with the Women’s World Cup fast approaching, the 2022/23 A-League Women season can be seen as one of the most pivotal competitions for women’s football in Australia.

Anna Green spent some time away from the A-League playing for different clubs around the world. She represented a number of clubs in Europe and spent the more recent years with Capital Football in New Zealand.

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When Green was asked about her journey back to playing in Australia, she certainly said a lot more than, “it feels good to be back.”

“It’s a really important year for women’s football in Australia and New Zealand,” Green said.

She said that the upcoming, locally hosted, Women’s World Cup was a driving factor behind her choice to come back and play for Sydney FC. But, despite this excitement, Green knows that the A-League Women is still far from what it could’ve grown to be during the nine years she was absent for.

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“It’s night and day in terms of the standard of the players and the professionalism of the A-League,” Green said.

“We’ve come such a long way, but we’ve still got a long way to go.”

Green then went on to highlight the importance of the work that the PFA is doing in building a long-term plan and sustainability for women’s football in Australia.

Even though the growth of the A-League Women over the past decade has been slow, growth is still growth and who knows what things will look like in a years’ time after the Women’s World Cup has shone it’s light over the nation.

“It’s just a really exciting time to be involved.” Green said.

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Feature Image Credit: Sydney FC

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Neve McGavock
Neve McGavockhttps://everneve.com/
Studying a Bachelor of Journalism and Creative Writing at the University of Wollongong. Covering Sydney FC for the 2022/23 season.

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